Stem Cell Research Archives - OOTHY™

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Category Archives for "Stem Cell Research"

Stem Cell Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by a disruption in the normal function of the brain due to an injury following a trauma, which can potentially cause severe physical, cognitive, and emotional impairment. In the U.S. over 2.5 million people suffer brain injuries each year and over 50,000 of them end in death and approximately 80,000 suffer permanent disability.

Research is currently underway with several clinical trials exploring stem cells and the effects they have on damage to the brain. According to NCBI, mesenchymal stem cells (also known as MSCs) have immunosuppressive properties that reduce inflammation in injured tissue. The amazing thing about most stem cells is their ability to hone in on the site of damage. Most stem cells can be administered systemically (intravenous) and they will migrate to the site of the brain injury. Once there, the stem cells will receive chemical “communications” from the cells of the damaged tissue which will cause the stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the damaged tissue to repair said tissue.

Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Brain Damage

As an adult, the most common way to get Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) is from your fat (adipose tissue) using a minimally invasive liposuction procedure your fat (adipose tissue) performed by a reputable clinic. The other method also has high efficacy is through from bone marrow and requires a little more invasive procedure where the cells are extracted from the bony area of your hip region.

For children, most researchers agree the best option for the type of MSCs that are already pre-wired for neurological and brain functions are the adult stem cells found in dental pulp. For kids losing baby teeth or wisdom teeth, collecting dental stem cells from the pulp of their tooth is a simple, non-invasive, non-controversial and potentially life-saving and life-enhancing.

Why Mesenchymal Stem Cells?

Mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate or “mature into” many different cell types including; osteoblasts (bone cells), chondrocytes (cells that makeup cartilage), myocytes (muscle cells), adipocytes (fat cells), neurons and recently described beta cells (cells found in the pancreas that synthesize insulin).

Are Kids Teeth Better than Adult Teeth?

Yes! The cells harvested from baby teeth, in particular, are at their optimum because they are young, vibrant, healthy, and full of functionality. By storing young dental stem cells now, they can be accessed in the future to take advantage of numerous age-related therapies in development.

Your Own Stem Cells are the Best Stem Cells.

Why? Your own stem cells are unique to you and highly valuable because at some point soon people will be using their own stem cells as the natural way to combat many health conditions — even aging itself.

Regenerative Medicine is an Emerging Field Involving Stem Cell Therapy.

Regenerative Medicine employs methods to restore the function of damaged tissue and organs. With all the emerging potential in tissue engineering applications using mesenchymal stem cells, a child’s loose baby tooth can provide first-rate mesenchymal stem cells that can be used in the future for cellular-therapy based applications. Mesenchymal stem cells have shown amazing promise in the potential treatment of traumatic brain injuries, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, Type I diabetes, heart attack, stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS, spinal injury, west syndrome and several others.

To read more about the studies and clinical trials, click on links below:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/…
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results…

References:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5316525/

Stem Cell Treatment for Autism Reviews

As parents, we will do anything to help our children. Finding the right treatment for a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder ranks right at the top.

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affects 1 in 59 children.  Parents are told treatments can help, but that this condition can’t be cured. Because there are more than 200,000 U.S. cases per year, multiple treatment plans are offered, and it’s difficult to navigate through all of the options.  

Stem Cell Therapy for ASD

One of the most recent treatment options being discussed is stem cell therapy. Although the therapies in the US are still experimental, there have been some promising results. Since no cure currently exists for autism spectrum disorder, the goal of treatment is to maximize a child’s ability to function by reducing ASD symptoms and supporting development.

The big question on everyone’s mind is, will stem cell therapy help treat autism?

Well, the answer isn’t a definitive one, and reviews are hard to come by because treatments in the U.S. are not FDA approved, experimental or not allowed at all. To help gather all of the latest information, we put together a list of well-reviewed stem cell clinics, docs, and resources.

The current therapies mostly utilize stem cells from birth tissue that’s high in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). But because most families don’t have birth tissue (cord blood, tissue, and placenta), some families are finding it helpful to store their own child’s stem cells non-invasively when their child loses a tooth (dental stem cells).

The Difference in Cord Blood vs. Cord Tissue, Placenta and Dental Stem Cells

Stem cells from cord blood are commonly used in the treatment of childhood blood diseases such as leukemia, sickle cell anemia, and lymphoma, to help replenish the patient’s blood supply with healthy new cells. These stem cells cannot be duplicated, and experts say due to the low volume of blood collected, they may only be able to treat a child until approximately ten years of age.  

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from birth tissue, placenta and teeth are more versatile as they can be used for treatments other than blood disorders and they can be duplicated for a lifetime of use. This type of cell has the potential to be transformed into other cells including cardiac, muscle, bone, cartilage, nerve, and fat tissue.

The mesenchymal stem cells found in teeth are the most widely researched type of stem cell. Based on the research so far, the best use for dental stem cells seems to be focused on neurological disorders and disease of the brain. This makes sense since the stem cells from teeth are found in our head.

Current studies offer hope for mental illness, diseases of the brain like autism, dementia, Alzheimer’s and neurological conditions like cerebral palsy, MS, and Parkinson’s.

In addition to treating conditions, MSCs are being used for other regenerative, preventative, and anti-aging benefits.

What Can Stem Cells Do For ASD?

Researchers hope to improve brain development with stem cell therapy.

Here are some anticipated improvements in autistic children after stem cell therapy:

  • Better tolerance of foods and improved digestion
  • More adequate behavior and social skills
  • Less or no fear of loud noises, strangers and bright colors
  • Improved verbal skills, speech
  • Improvement of writing skills
  • Improved self-care skills
  • Improved attention span, memory, and concentration

Because dental stem cells are in close proximity to the brain, they are being used for disorders related to the brain. Stem cells are thought to replenish damaged brain cells, reduce inflammation, increase immunity and blood flow so that the body can heal itself. There are many studies being conducted in order to better understand the benefits stem cells provide our bodies.  Once the scientific community has a better understanding of stem cells it is hoped that a whole new medical world will be opened up.

Although we are in the early stage of dental stem cell research, the data is promising. As always, do your stem cell research.  You know what the best course of action is for your child and your family. We all want to do everything we can to get the absolute best results, and when you do the research, the answers fall into place.

Resources, Reviews, Stem Cell Clinics, and Doctors

We posted an article recently about the work being done with Dental Stem Cells and the Tooth Fairy led by Dr. Alysson Muotri of California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Here are the links for more information about the research and to Dr. Muotri’s Lab.

Link to the video review of the research:
https://www.cirm.ca.gov/our-progress/video/reversing-autism-lab-help-stem-cells-and-tooth-fairy

https://www.cirm.ca.gov/our-progress/video/reversing-autism-lab-help-stem-cells-and-tooth-fairy

Link to basic info about baby teeth and stem cells:
https://www.sentinelsource.com/parent_express/family_wellness/baby-teeth-basics-from-birth-to-the-tooth-fairy/article_9bcffa3c-24c6-11e9-8a44-33e96f4c374e.html

Link to Dr. Muotri’s laboratory:
https://medschool.ucsd.edu/som/pediatrics/research/labs/muotri-lab/Pages/default.aspx

Other notable research is being spearheaded by Dr. Joanne Kurtzberg, MD Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development.
More info can be found here: https://autismcenter.duke.edu/.

Another study was done using umbilical cord blood and children with autism at Duke University:
https://www.cnn.com/2017/04/05/health/autism-cord-blood-stem-cells-duke-study/index.html

To stay in the loop with current and upcoming clinical trials based in the United States visit:
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/search

Are their Stem Cell Treatments for Autism Available Now?

Yes. Although the options are limited, there are a few reputable clinics that we follow closely. We have reviewed dozens of outcomes and the feedback from the parents have been very positive.

Dr. Riordan – The Stem Cell Institute (Panama) can be found here:
https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-autism/

Dr. Eduardo and Dr. Freddy – World Stem Cells Clinic (Mexico) can found here: https://worldstemcellsclinic.com/


References:

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